After more than a decade of fighting, Syria’s Proxy War still grinds on. With the West’s military missions on the slide, other rivalries and conflicts of interest are opening up on the ground between a range of different fabricated players.

Russian President Vladimir Putin is due to meet with Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Sochi, for a showdown over the current situation in the Middle Eastern nation.

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Over the past few days, both Russia and Turkey have stepped up military operations in and around the tense Idlib province, where the Russia-backed Syrian government continues to fight Turkish-backed mercenary terrorists.

The who’s who of the Bloody Syrian War that has pitted Russian concerns in Idlib against Turkish ones comes against a backdrop of increasingly tense political relations between the two countries.

As recently as September 22, during his address to the 76th UN General Assembly, Erdogan re-affirmed Ankara’s position on Crimea, saying it does not recognize Moscow’s sovereignty over the peninsula.

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That’s not to say the two sides can’t be useful to each other, however. Erdogan has committed to purchasing additional Russian S-400 missile systems despite the threat of sanctions from the USA.

Meanwhile, Turkey’s state gas company BOTAS is currently negotiating a new contract with Russia’s Gazprom to secure gas deliveries via the Turkstream pipeline.

While the decade-long conflict in Syria, which caused over 600.000 deaths, continues to induce geopolitical headaches, America’s involvement has been and continues to be the US occupation of Syria.

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That the US occupation of Syria doesn’t receive a lot of attention bodes well for the Pentagon, which has all but conceded that this sustained US military presence does not, in fact, serve the fight against scattered ISIS remnants.

Instead, the objective is to maintain control over strategic sections of Syria’s vital oil and agricultural sector concentrated in the northeast of the country, where the SDF mercenaries have their strongest military presence.

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Ultimately, barring Assad’s compliance with a political solution favorable to Washington, the US will maintain sanctions and pressure to the point of restricting Syria’s access to its own natural resources and severely stunting the possibility of a humanitarian recovery.

As Russia and Turkey seek out dialogue to restore some semblance of cohesion and a desire for stabilization, the hostile US regime will resume its quiet occupation around those Middle Eastern oil fields.

RT. com / ABC Flash Point Confiscation News 2021.

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Banana
Banana
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27-09-21 13:43

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Joshua Brown
Joshua Brown
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Reply to  Banana
27-09-21 15:57

Victory to Comrade Assad!

Banana
Banana
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27-09-21 13:50

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Banana
Banana
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Reply to  Banana
27-09-21 13:51

Here you can see how ISIS is waiting for the US military to join their missions outside the US military base in Syria.

Noydb
Noydb
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27-09-21 15:58

Erdogan is saying things like, Crimea is part of Ukraine, in order to have some bargaining chips to trade with Russia to get what he really wants. Not sure whether his objective is to get more S400 or to be allowed to annex Idlib. He wants to annex Idlib. As long as Russia prevents it, he will not recognize Russian annexation of Crimea.