The Gates Foundation is a major funder of the CGIAR system (formerly the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research) – a global partnership whose stated aim is to strive for a food-secured future.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation was launched in 2000 and had $46.8 billion in assets in 2018. It is the largest charitable foundation in the world and distributes more aid for global health than any government.

One of the foundation’s stated goals is to globally enhance healthcare and reduce extreme poverty. Its research is aimed at reducing rural poverty, increasing food security, improving human health and nutrition and ensuring sustainable management of natural resources.

In 2016, the Gates Foundation was accused of dangerously and unaccountably distorting the direction of international development.

“The Gates Foundation has rapidly become the most influential actor in the world of global health and agricultural policies, but there’s no oversight or accountability in how that influence is managed.

The foundation is relentlessly promoting big business-based initiatives such as industrial agriculture, private health care and education. But these are all potentially exacerbating the problems of poverty and lack of access to basic resources that the foundation is supposed to be alleviating.”

The foundation’s promotion of industrial agriculture across Africa, which would undermine existing sustainable, small-scale farming that is providing the vast majority of food across the continent.

The foundation is working with US agri-commodity trader Cargill in an $8 million project to “develop the soy value chain” in southern Africa.

Cargill is the biggest global player in the production of and trade in soy with heavy investments in South America where GM soy mono-crops (and agro-chemicals) have displaced rural populations and caused health problems and environmental damage.

The Gates foundation is also supporting projects involving other chemical and seed corporations, including DuPont, Syngenta and Bayer.

It is effectively promoting a model of industrial agriculture, the increasing use of agro-chemicals and patented seeds, the privatization of extension services and a very large focus on genetically modified crops.

More than 80% of Africa’s seed supply comes from millions of small-scale farmers recycling and exchanging seed from year to year.

But AGRA is promoting the commercial production of seed and is thus supporting the introduction of commercial (chemical-dependent) seed systems, which risk enabling a few large companies to control seed research and development, production and distribution.

The Gates Foundation is a prominent funder of the World Health Organization and UNICEF. Gates has been the largest or second largest contributor to the WHO’s budget in recent years. His foundation provided 11% of the WHO’s entire budget in 2015, which is 14 times greater than the UK government’s contribution.

Our children are growing up exposed to a toxic cocktail of weedkillers, insecticides, and fungicides. It’s on their food and in their water, and it’s even doused over their parks and playgrounds. 

Many governments insist that our standards of protection from these pesticides are strong enough. But as a scientist and a lawyer who specialises in chemicals and their potential impact on people’s fundamental rights, I beg to differ.

Last month it was revealed that in recommending that glyphosate – the world’s most widely-used pesticide – was safe, the EU’s food safety watchdog copied and pasted pages of a report directly from Monsanto, the pesticide’s manufacturer. Revelations like these are simply shocking.

While Bill Gates promotes a chemical-intensive model of agriculture that dovetails with the needs and value chains of agri-food conglomerates.

Reality outlines the spiraling rates of disease in the UK and the USA and lays the blame at the door of the agro-chemical corporations that Gates has opted to get into bed with. She focuses on the impact of glyphosate-based herbicides as well as the cocktail of chemicals sprayed on crops.

However, the mainstream narrative is to blame individuals for their ailments and conditions which are said to result from ‘lifestyle choices’.

Yet Monsanto’s German owner Bayer has confirmed that more than 42,700 people have filed suits against Monsanto alleging that exposure to Roundup herbicide caused them or their loved ones to develop non-Hodgkin lymphoma and that Monsanto covered up the risks.  

The Gates Foundation is part of the problem, not the solution. To more fully appreciate this, let us turn to a February 2020 article in the journal Globalization’s.

Its author, Ashok Kumbamu, argues that the ultimate aim of promoting new technologies – whether GM seeds, agro-chemicals or com-modified knowledge – on a colossal scale is to make agricultural inputs and outputs essential commodities, create dependency and bring all farming operations into the capitalist fold.

To properly understand Bill Gates’s ‘philanthropy’ is not to take stated goals and objectives at face value but to regard his ideology as an attempt to manufacture consent and prevent and marginalize more radical agrarian change that would challenge prevailing power structures and act as impediments to capitalist interests.

Global Research California / ABC Flash Point A-Z News 2020.

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Bayoya
Bayoya
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09-03-20 17:31

Propaganda on the edge?